New Work

Sandeep Mukherjee
Parabolic, 2012
Acrylic and acrylic ink on Duralene
72 x 60 inches

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October 21 - November 25, 2012

For the past decade, Sandeep Mukherjee has made paintings on Duralene - a polymer film, that simulates the slick, luminous surface of celluloid. Using diverse tools ranging from brushes to concrete brooms, Mukherjee applies acrylic inks with broad, physical and rhythmic gestures of his hand and body. Mukherjee incorporates a variety of painterly techniques: addition, redistribution, and subtraction of pigment in spiraling and overlapping forms to create nature-based abstractions. Layers of aqueous acrylic ink appear to float over a translucent plane evoking the meditative properties of mandalas, kaleidoscopes, and fractals. Often compared to the works of Lee Mullican and mid-century spiritual abstraction, the radiating, cosmic arrangements painted on the film-like surface of Duralene speak more to blown-up stills of the experimental films of Jean Painlevé and Oskar Fischinger than to paintings on canvas.

Mukherjee's most recent works introduce elements of tension which serve to interrupt the artist's numinous and contemplative arrangements. Incursions of vine-like forms and erasures interrupt and jostle lyrical and rhythmic patterns. The resulting visual drama is evocative of time-lapse photography of biological phenomena. The interplay between tranquil and menacing forms and the tension between process, image, and material suspend each piece in various states of becoming.


Born in Pune, India, Sandeep Mukherjee lives and works in Los Angeles. He received his MFA from UCLA. Recent solo exhibitions include: Brennan & Griffin (New York), Project 88 (Mumbai), Sister and Cottage Home (Los Angeles), Margo Leavin Gallery (Los Angeles) and the Pomona College Museum of Art (Claremont). Mukherjee has been included in group exhibitions at MOCA (Los Angeles), the UCLA Hammer Museum (Los Angeles), and the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts (San Francisco) among others. His works are in numerous public collections, including those of MOCA, Los Angeles; MOMA, New York; The Los Angeles County Museum of Art; UCLA Hammer Museum.